© 2019 by Wheel Life Stories  |  Website by IAMOPPO

  • Instagram Social Icon
  • YouTube Social  Icon
  • Facebook Social Icon
  • Tumblr Social Icon
  • Twitter Social Icon

Home  |  About  |  Stories  |  Shop  |  Press  |  Policies

Keep Up With Us!

WHEEL LIFE STORIES PRESENTS

PEOPLE of the WHEEL WORLD

1/7

There are many words that can define Tobi Green-Adenowo, however unmotivated is not one of them. Tobi is a star, and advocate for the differently abled community. She embodies beauty, strength, and is wise beyond her years. She truly wants to make a difference. Tobi unfortunately, understands the hardships one can face in life. She’s battled with injustices from the foster care system to the mistreatment from others due to having Osteogenesis disease. Defying the odds, Tobi graduated with a degree in TV Broadcasting/Dance. Follow Tobi on social media (@toughcookietee on Instagram), to catch her amazing dance/makeup videos and using her voice to help the community.

Read the full interview below

Fun Facts

Favorite color?

Purple

What is Osteogenesis (brittle bone disease) & when did you realize you were “different”?

It’s a genetic condition, there is less collagen in my bones which means I break bones very easy. I am the only person in my family living with OI, I have broken approximately 75 bones. I realized I was different when I was in Primary School and I had to use a wheelchair to get around, I would also have an assistant with me in class.

 

At what age did you start to dance, how did it make you feel? 

I started dance at 13 in High School and got involved with after school dance activities, eventually I decided to do it as a class to be marked on and compete in competitions, it make me feel special as I realised that I had a talent and it gave me a way to express myself. (Almost like another language/way of communicating)

 

What changes need to be made in the foster care system especially for children with disabilities?

Laws need to be put in place to protect children in care with disability to protect them and also a system to be put in place so they are looked after during their time in care and after once they start living on their own.

 

What does disability inclusion mean to you?

It means matching up the basic things able bodied people do daily and independently in different stages of their lives and making sure this reflects in the disabled community (basic human rights and needs to develop) 

 

What is your biggest accomplishment?

My biggest accomplishment to date is going to LA this August to the Rollettes LA Dance Experience on my own from London, by myself.

If you could go back in time what advice would you give to your younger self?

Focus on what you love only and don’t worry about the rest it will fall in place and people will automatically realise your potential.

Learn

more

about

 OI